Claytor Lake State Park

Ideal for swimming, hiking and picnicking, Claytor Lake is known for sport fishing and boating. The park has a full-service marina with docking slips, supplies, fuel, boat rentals and refreshments.

Located on the 4,500 acre, 21 mile long Claytor Lake (from which the park was named) in the New River Valley of southwestern Virginia, Claytor Lake State Park offers a wide variety of activities for water and land enthusiasts. Easily accessible from Interstate 81, the park features the only full service marina in the state park system. In addition, there are miles of hiking trails, swimming, camping facilities, cabins and a visitor center. The visitor center is located in the historic Howe House. The lake and the park are named after Graham Claytor (1886-1971), who was vice president of Appalachian Power and supervised construction of the dam.

Claytor Lake State Park covers 472 acres. Lake size, 4,500 acres; 21 miles long. The park has approximately three miles of lake frontage.

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Things to See and Do In and Around Farmville

Enjoy a dramatic hike or bike ride 125 feet above the Appomattox River. High Bridge Trail is a 31-mile converted “rail trail” for hiking and biking. High Bridge is the longest recreational bridge in Virginia, and one of the longest in the United States. You can rent bikes at the Outdoor Adventure Store in Downtown Farmville, then jump on the trail a block away and embark on your 4.5-mile ride to the bridge. A must-see attraction!
When Longwood University made national news for being chosen as the site of the October 4 Vice Presidential debate, its out-of-the-way location in southern Virginia – in a town called Farmville, no less! – was part of the story.

True, Farmville is a small town, and a very charming one. But the abundance of things to see and do, in town and nearby, is a revelation to many. Think two-college town, furniture shopping, history and outdoor fun. Here are a few of the highlights:
R.R. Moton Museum
The former Moton High School, now a National Historic Landmark and museum, tells the story of a 1951 student strike that helped ignite the Civil Rights era. Led by 16-year-old Barbara Johns, the Moton Student Strike produced three-fourths of the plaintiffs in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the landmark Supreme Court decision desegregating U.S. schools.

Green Front Furniture
Spread over six blocks of Downtown Farmville, Green Front Furniture comprises 12 buildings of furniture, including three converted tobacco warehouses, filled with fine furnishings, rugs, imports and accessories. This discount furniture powerhouse is a destination in itself, drawing fervent fans from hundreds of miles away.

Hampden-Sydney College
Founded in 1775, Hampden-Sydney began as the southernmost representative of the “Log College” form of higher education established by the Scotch-Irish Presbyterians in America, whose academic ideal was the University of Edinburgh, seat of the Scottish Enlightenment. Its Esther Thomas Atkinson Museum promotes the history of the College and its role in the history of Virginia and our nation.

The Adventure Park at Sandy River Retreat
Just six miles southeast of Downtown Farmville, the Adventure Park features 20 zip lines and 60 obstacles, making it Virginia’s largest and grandest aerial adventure park.
 

Outdoor Lover’s Paradise
Hiking. Biking. Boating. Fishing. Kayaking. Canoeing. Swimming. Camping. Horseback riding. If you’re into the outdoors, you’re in the right place! Farmville is surrounded by rivers and streams and two of Virginia’s finest bass fishing lakes – Briery Creek Lake and Sandy River Reservoir – making it a fisherman’s paradise. With five state parks, four wildlife management areas, and three state forests within a short drive, it’s a great place to experience the great outdoors.

Longwood Center for the Visual Arts
Located a block from the Longwood University campus in the heart of Downtown Farmville, the LCVA celebrates art with the community through exhibits, programs, activities and educational outreach. All exhibitions and opening receptions are free and open to the public.

Longwood Bed & Breakfast
608 High Street,
Farmville, VA 23901
(434) 395-2617
http://www.longwood.edu/bedandbreakfast/

History of the Bed & Breakfast

The Bed & Breakfast was originally built in 1880 and served as a private residence to Dr. Cunningham, who later served as President of the college (1887-1897) which at that time was called the Female State Normal School.

The house was later purchased by the University for the president, Dr. Jarman, and served as the home of Longwood Presidents until 1969. In 1969, President Dr. Willett moved his family to the current presidential home, Longwood House.

The house then became work space for the Alumni Office and later transitioned into overnight accommodations for faculty/staff, alumni, parents, and friends of the university.

Today it is known as the Longwood Bed & Breakfast open to the public to use and enjoy.

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Longwood Bed & Breakfast
608 High Street,
Farmville, VA 23901
(434) 395-2617
http://www.longwood.edu/bedandbreakfast/

New England Fall Travel

New England may try to lay claim to fall foliage drives, and Renaissance festivals may happen nationwide, but when it comes to autumnal living, Washington, D.C. is doing it right.

 

1. The Maryland Renaissance Festival, now in its 39th year, is one of the biggest and most freewheeling festivals of its kind in the country. Held on weekends from late August through October 25th, Renn Fest sprawls out across 27 acres in Crownsville, Maryland, and depicts life in a fictional English village called Revel Grove.

 

Things to look forward to: There’s the 140-odd artisans selling their crafts, taverns full of beer, and food stands peddling turkey legs, “steak on a stake,” fresh seafood, and sandwiches. The village also abounds with performers ranging from a Shakespeare troupe and bawdy balladeers to jugglers, magicians, and even a sword swallower.

 

2. It’s not New England, but the Mid-Atlantic sure has its own fall foliage beauty. Visit the U.S. National Arboretum to see its collection of bonsai trees in full seasonal splendor in the Autumn Bonsai: The Colors of Nature exhibit at the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum, or wander through some of the city’s other natural spaces such as Rock Creek Park and the National Mall.

 

3. If you’ve got a car and a little bit of time to kill, consider the 75-mile trek out to Shenandoah National Park, known for its amazing vistas of Skyline Drive.

4. Fall weekends are a great time to take a short trek out of the city and into the nearby farms of Maryland and Virginia. At Butler’s Orchard, you can jump on hayrides, navigate corn mazes, and pick pumpkins as part of their annual Potato Festival, or pick apples on their pick-your-own farm.

 

5. Meanwhile, George Washington’s former home hosts its own Mount Vernon Fall Harvest Family Days (October 24-October 25), offering wagon rides, a straw bale maze, apple roasting,18th-century dancing demos, and wheat treading in its barn.

Longwood Bed & Breakfast
608 High Street,
Farmville, VA 23901
(434) 395-2617
http://www.longwood.edu/bedandbreakfast/

The Blanton-Hanbury Room

The Blanton-Hanbury Room is named after the couple who originally owned the massive bedroom set. Mr. Blanton, who was from the Farmville area, traveled to the 1900 Centennial Fair in Philadelphia where he purchased this set for his bride-to-be, Miss Hanbury.

 

This furniture remained in their family for many years; however, due to its size it became difficult to move into their modern-day sized homes. The family donated this queen bedroom set in the Blanton and Hanbury names and asked that we create a museum quality Victorian bedroom.

 

The bedroom contains hand-painted wallpaper, a one-of-a-kind carpet hand-made for us in France using the small looms typical of the Victorian period, wood grained doors, marbleized mantle, and hand-made window treatments. This room also features a private bath.

Longwood Bed & Breakfast
608 High Street,
Farmville, VA 23901
(434) 395-2617
http://www.longwood.edu/bedandbreakfast/

Grant Room

Located on the second floor this room is referred to as The Grant Room because General Ulysses S. Grant used the furniture when he stayed at the old Price Edward Hotel on his way through Farmville to Appomattox.

 

 The room features a hand carved lacquered antique queen bed, table, dresser set that is intricately laced with gold paint.

 

It is believed that General Grant wrote the first request for surrender to General Robert E. Lee on one of the two tables located in the room. The furniture set was donated by Harrier Booker Lamb ‘28. This room offers a private bath.

Longwood Bed & Breakfast
608 High Street,
Farmville, VA 23901
(434) 395-2617
http://www.longwood.edu/bedandbreakfast/